Evan's Space

Wonders of Physics


Leave a comment

2017PurePhyP2Q5 Two points on the rope wave with displacement-time graphs given

In this this question, the displacement-time graphs are given, which are different from displacement-distance graphs.

In the displacement-time graphs of A and B, they show the displacement of that particular point at different timing. E,g, at t = 0s, the A is at the rest position (0 displacement) and at time 0.2 s it is at the maximum displacement. This means A is going up from t = 0 s to 0.2 s.

Solutions:
(a) Amplitude: 1.5 cm
(b)(i) Frequency is the number of complete waves produced in 1 second.
(ii) period T = 0.8s, f = 1/T = 1/0.8 = 1.25 Hz
(c) Closest possible positions of A and B, (refer to the video), is when the
time taken for the wave to move from A to B is T/4 = 0.8/4 = 0.2 s.
speed = distance/time = 38/0.2 = 190 cm/s approx. 200 cm/s
(ii) There are various possibilities in which B can be 38 cm to the right of A. Besides T/4, it can be 1.25T or 2.25 T etc. Hence the speed can be other values.

Refer to the video for the full explanation


Leave a comment

Light and sound wave diagram in different mediums with different density

Light and sound are both waves. So both carry energy from one place to another.

Light, which is part of the electromagnetic spectrum, is a transverse wave, It can travel through a vacuum at speed 3.0 x 108 m/s. As the light travels from an optically less dense medium (air) to an optically denser medium (liquid or glass), the light undergoes refraction and bends towards the normal due to a decrease in speed.

Light: Optically less dense medium to denser medium: 
– speed decreases
– wavelength shorter
– frequency remains constant

Sound is a longitudinal wave. It requires a medium to pass through and it cannot pass through a vacuum. Opposite to light, as the sound travels from a less dense medium (air) into a denser medium (water or solid), the speed increases.

Sound: Less dense medium to denser medium:
– speed increases
– wavelength longer
– frequency remains constant

Refers to the image below to understand how the waves behave in different mediums.
Click here to revise on the calculation of refractive index for light

light and sound


Leave a comment

Using Slinky Coil to demonstrate Transverse and Longitudinal Waves

Though slinky coil is commonly used to demonstrate transverse and longitudinal waves, you must not quote it as an example for either of the waves.

  • Transverse waves are waves in which the direction of the wave is perpendicular to the direction of the vibration of the particles. Examples are light wave, water wave or all the waves in the electromagnetic spectrum (which light is one of the waves.
  • Longitudinal waves are waves in which the direction of the wave is parallel to the direction of the vibration of the particles.  Example is sound wave.

 

Transverse Waves (slinky coil)

Longitudinal Waves (slinky coil)

Click here to see the simulations of transverse and longitudinal waves.

 

 


Leave a comment

Waves Summary

 

waves 01

Click here to view the simulations transverse and longitudinal waves

Students are confused when they need to visualise what is the direction of the particles the next moment of the wave. There is a simpler way solve such question.

To know what is the motion of the particles as a transverse wave passes through, click to view the question and the video tutorial.

waves 02

Click here to view of a question asked on rope wave – how should you move your hand to create different waves.

waves 03 graphs

Click here to view another example on graphs

waves 04 wavefronts

Click here to know more about wavefronts created in a ripple tank.